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Posted by On 8:41 AM

Pro-IS cleric gets death for inspiring terror attacks in Indonesia

Indonesian anti-terror police officers escort Aman Abdurrahman (C), who masterminded a 2016 gun and suicide attack in the capital Jakarta that left four attackers and four civilians dead, after hearing the judges’ verdict at a South Jakarta court in Jakarta on June 22, 2018. Indonesian cleric Aman Abdurrahman was sentenced to death over his role in a 2016 Islamic State terror attack that saw a suicide bomber blow himself up at a Jakarta Starbucks cafe. / AFP PHOTO / BAY ISMOYO

JAKARTA â€" The South Jakarta District Court has found Friday Aman Abdurrahman guilty of inciting several terror attacks in Indonesia and sentenced the radical cleric to death.

“The defendant has been found guilty beyond reasonable doubt of inciting others to commit terrorism,” presiding judge Akhmad Jaini read in the verdict.< /p>

Aman, the de facto leader of Jamaah Ansharut Daulah (JAD), a local affiliate of the Islamic State (IS) terror group, had been found responsible for inciting others to commit at least five terror attacks in Indonesia, including the Thamrin shootings and suicide bombings in 2016 on Jl. MH Thamrin in Central Jakarta and the Kampung Melayu bombings in East Jakarta last year.

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The panel of five judges found his teachings were behind the terror attacks.

Aman denied that he was involved in the attack, despite admitting that he had urged his followers to go to Syria to join the IS in its quest to establish a global caliphate.

He denounced in his defense plea the recent terror attacks in Indonesia, saying the perpetrators were ignorant and mentally ill.

The judges dismissed Aman’s claim, saying based on witnesses’ testimony he had instructed his followers to create chaos and panic in Indonesia as mandated by IS leader Al-Baghdadi.

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Source: Google News Network: Liputan 24 English | Berita 24 English | Warta 24 English | Netizen 24 Indonesia

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Posted by On 4:55 AM

Indonesia's debus fighters: Tough as nails

This picture taken on February 4, 2018 shows Indonesian debus master Aris Afandi showing his skill "unhurt" while cutting his tongue with a blade during a demonstration in Bandung.

This picture taken on February 4, 2018 shows Indonesian debus master Aris Afandi showing his skill "unhurt" while cutting his tongue with a blade during a demonstration in Bandung.

Mulyadi pounds a nail into his nostril, leaving it embedded in his face, horrifying a group of slack-jawed spectators of debus, an Indonesian tradition blending martial arts with grotesque self-injury.
Some of his audience may have had enough, but Mulyadi isn't done yet.
As hypnotic drum-and-flute music plays in the background, he produces a bowl full of nails and appears to stuff a fistful of them into his mouth, swallowing like a champion speed eater. He opens his mouth and sticks out his tongue for any doubters left in the room.
Many outside superstitious Indonesia would write off the Javanese art as all smoke-and-mirrors -- and sleight of hand undoubtedly plays a part. But practitioners insist it is divine intervention that keeps them from a trip to the hospital.

This picture taken on February 4, 2018 shows Indonesian debus fighters performing the Indonesian martial art of "pencak silat" during a demonstration in Bandung. Many outside superstitious Indonesia would write off the Javanese art of "debus" as all smoke-a nd-mirrors -- and sleight of hand undoubtedly plays a part. But practitioners insist it is divine intervention that keeps them from a trip to the hospital. / AFP PHOTO.
"Debus is real, with real blood and real machetes. There are no tricks," says Mulyadi, 50.
He declines to say how his body can supposedly process -- and expel -- the nails, calling it a "secret".
"They may come out in a few days or they may stay in there, depending on my mood," he laughs.
Debus was born in the 16th century during the reign of the first sultan of the Banten kingdom, who exploited its claims to invincibility to galvanise opposition against Dutch colonisers and to spread Islam -- although the tradition's historical links to religion are still hotly debated.
- 'It's so extreme' -
Once a favourite at weddings and other celebrations including -- improbably -- circumcisions, debus starts with a series of martial ar ts moves and prayers to the heavens for protection from injury.
Debus master Aris Afandi puts it to the test as he goes at a fellow fighter's arm with a machete, although his foot pounding and yelling seems to have more impact than the cut.
Afandi chants a prayer and wipes some blood from his comrade's arm to reveal what appears to be only a minor injury.
"When we are chanting the prayers, our bodies are blanketed by an invisible, subtle energy that gives us protection," he told AFP at a training centre in Bandung, 150 kilometres (90 miles) south of Jakarta.
Not to be outdone, another fighter lowers a blunt-ended power drill onto his tongue while another walks on bamboo thorns before rolling in them.
Nearby, a sledgehammer crashes into the end of a large stick that appears to be pressed against a fighter's stomach, eliciting a howling cry.
Onlookers aren't sure whether to snap pictures or look away.
"I have goosebumps b ecause it's so extreme," said Rohana Rosdiani, a 37-year-old spectator.
"They ate nails and drilled their stomach as if they're building a house. I can imagine how painful it is if you just cut your skin a bit, let alone pierce and puncture it."
- 'In it for the passion' -

The Banten provincial government is trying to revive interest in the fading tradition, hosting an event last year that featured more than 5,000 fighters -- a record.
But the future of debus is not guaranteed, as poor pay dissuades many newcomers from taking up the gruesome business full-time.
"Fighters are in it for the passion.... You can't make ends meet by performing debus," Afandi said.
Some Muslim clerics say the tradition is haram, or forbidden, on account of its links to supernatural beliefs, which are common across the vast Southeast Asian archipelago -- also the world's most populous Muslim-majority nation .
Some fighters have been seriously injured in the past, and last year a group of men were hospitalised after they rinsed their hands in acid, following an instruction from a self-described debus master who claimed he could make them indestructible.
True invincibility requires an unwavering belief in god's power, Afandi insists.
"The higher one's devotion to god, the stronger the energy," he added.
"That energy turns into a mess if someone hesitates." - AFP Related NewsSource: Google News Network: Liputan 24 English | B erita 24 English | Warta 24 English | Netizen 24 Indonesia

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Posted by On 11:10 PM

Indonesia court sentences cleric behind attacks to death

Radical Islamic cleric Aman Abdurrahman, center, is escorted by police officers after his sentence hearing at South Jakarta District Court in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, June 22, 2018. Abdurrahman was sentenced to death by an Indonesian court Friday for ordering Islamic State group-affiliated militants to carry out attacks including the January 2016 suicide bombing at a Starbucks in Jakarta. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
The Associated Press Islamic cleric Aman Abdurrahman, center, is escorted by police officers upon arrival for his trial at South Jakarta District Court in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, June 22, 2018. An Indonesian court has sentenced Abdurrahman to death for ordering Islamic State group-affiliated militants to carry out attacks including the January 2016 suicide bombing at a Starbucks in Jakarta. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
The Associated Press Radical Islamic cleric Aman Abdurrahman reacts after his sentence hearing at South Jakarta District Court in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday , June 22, 2018. Abdurrahman was sentenced to death by an Indonesian court Friday for ordering Islamic State group-affiliated militants to carry out attacks including the January 2016 suicide bombing at a Starbucks in Jakarta. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
The Associated Press Radical Islamic cleric Aman Abdurrahman sits at the court room for his sentencing hearing at South Jakarta District Court in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, June 22, 2018. An Indonesian court has sentenced Abdurrahman to death for ordering Islamic State group-affiliated militants to carry out attacks including the January 2016 suicide bombing at a Starbucks in Jakarta. (AP Ph oto/Tatan Syuflana)
The Associated Press Radical Islamic cleric Aman Abdurrahman sits at the court room for his sentencing hearing at South Jakarta District Court in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, June 22, 2018. An Indonesian court has sentenced Abdurrahman to death for ordering Islamic State group-affiliated militants to carry out attacks including the January 2016 suicide bombing at a Starbucks in Jakarta. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
The Associated Press Indonesian police stand guard outside a court room during sentence hearing for radical Islamic cleric Aman Abdurrahman at South Jakarta District Court in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, June 22, 2018. An Indonesian court has sentenced Abdurrahman to death for ordering Islamic State group-affiliated militants to carry out attacks including the January 2016 suicide bombing at a Starbucks in Jakarta. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
The Associated Press Islamic cleric Aman Abdurrahman, right, is escort ed by police officers upon arrival for his trial at South Jakarta District Court in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, June 22, 2018. An Indonesian court has sentenced Abdurrahman to death for ordering Islamic State group-affiliated militants to carry out attacks including the January 2016 suicide bombing at a Starbucks in Jakarta. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
The Associated Press Radical Islamic cleric Aman Abdurrahman sits at the court room during his sentence hearing at South Jakarta District Court in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, June 22, 2018. Abdurrahman was sentenced to death by an Indonesian court Friday for ordering Islamic State group-affiliat ed militants to carry out attacks including the January 2016 suicide bombing at a Starbucks in Jakarta. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
The Associated Press Radical Islamic cleric Aman Abdurrahman reacts after his sentence hearing at South Jakarta District Court in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, June 22, 2018. Abdurrahman was sentenced to death by an Indonesian court Friday for ordering Islamic State group-affiliated militants to carry out attacks including the January 2016 suicide bombing at a Starbucks in Jakarta. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
The Associated Press Source: Google News Network: Liputan 24 English | Berita 24 English | Warta 24 English | Netizen 24 Indonesia

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Posted by On 3:10 PM

From 'Villages of Idiots' to tourism destination: Unshackling the mentally ill in Indonesia

Email From 'Villages of Idiots' to tourism destination: Unshackling the mentally ill in Indonesia

Posted June 24, 2018 05:50:43

A women with shackled on one of her feet Photo: Tens of thousands of Indonesians with mental disorder were still shackled in 2016. (Human Rights Watch: Andrea Star Reese) Related Story: When you're so poor you feel like you don't control your own life Related Story: 'Why are they presenting to emergency?': Alarm sounded on youth mental health Related Story: A thousand mental health jobs to be lost in Victoria, lobby group fears Related Story: How healing the landscape helped heal a troubled mind Map: Indonesia

In a cluster of villages in the Ponorogo district in Indonesia's East Java province, there exists an unusually high concentration of people who are living with a wide spectrum of mental disorders.

Key points:

  • Tens of thousands of Indonesians with a mental disorder were believed to shackled
  • The majority of the people with the illness are poor farm workers with low education
  • Many mentally-ill patients are now earning a regular income by selling bags, mats and eggs

Hundreds of mentally ill villagers are believed to have been born with malnutrition, and couldn't get the care they needed due to a lack of access to mental health services.

"In 2008, when the media blew up with the story of our villages, they called it 'Villages of Idiots', and, of course, we were not comfortable with the title," said Eko Mulyadi, leader of the Karangpatihan village.

The Ponorogo district came under the spotlight after more than 400 people were reported as suffering from mental illness.

The alarming number meant almost every family had at least one member who had a mental disability.

It was also reported that some people were shackled or isolated in cage behind their family homes â€" a common practice known as "pasung" among many Indonesian villagers â€" used to treat the mentally ill who are often considered as being possessed.

'People just just ate what they had'

External Link: HRW report on how Indonesians with psychosocial disabilities are shackled or forced into institutions.

A Human Rights Watch r eport in 2016 said while the practice was banned in 1977 by the Indonesian Government, tens of thousands of people with a mental disorder were still shackled and tied down to their bed or caged.

Mr Mulyadi said the plague of mental health disorders could be traced back to the massive harvest failures in the 1960s, when the country suffered from civil unrest and social divisions during the anti-communist hysteria.

"People â€" particularly pregnant women â€" just ate what they had, which was tubers [a part of the plant that grows beneath the soil's surface] from unhealthy soil," Mr Mulyadi told the ABC.

"As a result, many infants were born with malnutrition, including iodine deficiency, that allegedly caused them to suffer mental disorders."

A green hill with waterfall Photo: People in the district of Ponorogo live on slopes covered in unhealthy soil. (Supplied: Agus Kurniawan)

In the Ponorogo district, the villages of Karangpatihan, Krebet, Sidoharjo, and Pandak have the highest number of people living with a mental health disorder, and they have a few things in common.

The people in those villages live on slopes covered in unhealthy soil, which has long made it hard to cultivate and difficult to access transportation.

Mr Mulyadi said the majority of people were poor farm workers, had poor education, and ate 'tiwul' (made from cassava to substitute rice).

While the villagers' quality of life improved with the support of donors after their stories were told by media around the world, Mr Mulyadi said additional food packs and rice did not change their situation.

Mentally ill villagers can 'no longer be underestimated'

Five men standing together on the side of a road. Photo: Eko Mulyadi, centre, created a program with livelihood projects to help villagers living with mental illness. (Supplied)

After witnessing the struggles in the village, Mr Mulyadi created a program with livelihood projects â€" such as raising cattle and poultry â€" so that villagers with mental illness could become more independent.

"They were very dependent before, and we realised people wouldn't keep helping them in the long-term, and if we let that happen, they would be even more dependent on others," Mr Mulyadi told the ABC.

"Even when there was just a random car driving by, mentally ill villagers would run to it because they thought it would distribute some stuff.

"We wanted to make a big change to counter the pessimists who said these people were useless."

Mr Mulyadi and other residents in Karangpatihan formed a non-government organisation called 'Rumah Harapan' â€" or House of Hope â€" to involve the mentally ill in their community empowerment program.

A group of three painting behind a car. Photo: Products including mats are sold in markets in Jakarta and Surabaya. (Supplied)

The program included various activities and training to help them become more self-reliant and self-sustaining, including generating a regular income.

The villagers sold mats and eggs from the poultry they were given, Mr Mulyadi said, and also earned money by selling cat fish and livestock they rais ed.

"At the end of the day, they can enhance their own lives and no longer be underestimated", he said.

Mr Mulyadi said there were now fewer than 100 people with a mental disorder in his village, a significant drop from a decade ago.

"Many of them were born in the 1960s, became sick and have already passed away," he said.

"But now we see people have a better quality of life and they have income to buy better food."

Villagers who were a burden are now breadwinners

Old women holding poultry inside traditional baskets. Photo: One program involves giving live poultry, so villagers can sell the eggs and continue breeding. (Supplied)

Another man, named Zainuri, has also been helping villagers with mental disorders develop skills in arts and crafts at 'Rumah Kasih Sayang' â€" or House of the Passionate â€" for seven years and is now the coordinator of 25 volunteers.

He said more than 250 disabled villagers across nine villages including Karangpatihan came to the non-government organisation regularly to produce home decorations, accessories, bags, and even batik fabrics.

Twpo people  showing bag made by traditional weaving method Photo: Zainuri, far right, with women in the bag making program. (Supplied)

While Zainuri admitted it took a lot of patience to teach people with a mental disorder, he said the program had been very successful.

"To say intellectually disabled people are not capable is very wrong, they are actually capable, only if we give them a go," he said.

Zainuri said their products, including mats made from fabrics from factory waste, were already sold in markets in Jakarta and Surabaya, two of Indonesia's biggest cities.

The villagers usually sold two mats in a day for about $2 each, which Zainuri said was more than what people typically earnt in the district.

"We have equipped them with skills that really changed their life and economic situations," he said, adding that people who used to be a burden on their families were now becoming breadwinners.

The organisation has been educating pregnant women and newly wed couples about the importance of eating nutritional foods, and teaching mentally ill people how to live a healthy lifestyle.

A group of    people on a stage dancing to music Photo: People living with mental illness participated at a Ponorogo festival. (Supplied, Muhammad Nuryasin.)

With their newfound independence, people living with a mental illness were now socialising with other people â€" something their parents had prevented them from doing, Zainuri added.

The Karangpatihan village is now trying hard to shake its infamous reputation of being a "village of idiots" and re-establish itself as a tourism destination.

"We have beautiful spots in our village," Mr Mulyadi said.

"Visitors can come to our place to see how these people create something with their hands."

Many visitors from other areas in Indonesia have also travelled to Karangpatihan to do a comparative study and find inspiration for tackling similar problems in their home regions, Mr Mulyadi said.

A young man with a psychosocial disability is chained in a back room at his family home in Ponorogo, East Java. 2014 Photo: The villages have come a long way since Human Rights Watch reported people being chained in their family back rooms. (HRW: Andrea Star Reese)

Topics: mental-health, human-interest, travel-and-tourism, community-and-society, indonesia, asia

Source: Google News Network: Liputan 24 English | Berita 24 English | Warta 24 English | Netizen 24 Indonesia

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Posted by On 3:10 PM

Indonesia's slow and circuitous road to democracy

Email Indonesia's slow and circuitous road to democracy

Posted June 24, 2018 05:00:00

Indonesian presidential candidate Joko 'Jokowi' Widodo Photo: Indonesian President Joko Widodo. (Reuters: Beawiharta) Map: Indonesia

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the resignation of Indonesia's authoritarian president, Suharto, who led Indonesia from 1966 until 1998. Suharto's resignation, which was motivated by a faltering Indonesian economy and widespread anti-Suharto demonstrations, marke d the beginning of Indonesia's transition to democracy.

Significant progress has been made in relation to Indonesia's democratisation over the past 20 years.

Nonetheless, a culture of impunity regarding historical human rights abuses persists in Indonesia and human rights violations continue to be perpetrated by the Indonesian government and security forces.

Positive developments in post-Suharto Indonesia

During Suharto's New Order regime, some political parties were banned by the government, in part to prevent them from participating in elections and during elections.

Voter intimidation was used by the Indonesian army (the TNI) to pressure Indonesians to vote for Golkar (Suharto's political vehicle).

During this period, the Indonesian parliament, which was responsible for electing the Indonesian president, was largely stacked with Suharto's supporters and unsurprisingly re-elected Suharto six times.

Post-Suharto era Indonesia has had regular, competitive, free and fair elections, including direct presidential and vice-presidential elections, the first of which occurred in 2004.

During the Suharto regime, the government closed down media outlets that were critical of it. In contrast, post-1998, Indonesian media reports that are critical of the Indonesian government are regularly published.

Moreover, in 2017, Freedom House, an American non-government organisation which monitors human rights globally rated the press in Indonesia, the Philippines and Timor-Leste as "partly free" and rated the media in all other Southeast Asian states as unfree in 2017.

Searching for the truth about a massacre in West PapuaVideo: Searching for the truth about a massacre in West Papua (7.30)

Challenges remain on the h uman rights front

Despite these positive developments in relation to press freedom, foreign journalists' access to the Indonesian province of West Papua, where a pro-independence movement exists, remains restricted by Indonesian authorities.

Former Indonesian military chief Wiranto Photo: General Wiranto in 2004.

Furthermore, a BBC journalist was expelled from West Papua this year for criticising the Indonesian government's response to the current malnutrition crisis in the province on Twitter.

Indonesian and Papuan journalists are also at times harassed, intimidated and assaulted by Indonesian security forces.

Since West Papua's annexation by Indonesia in 1963, the TNI and Indonesian police have repeatedly used force a gainst Papuans at protests, resulting in the killings of Papuans, and detained and imprisoned pro-independence Papuans who participate in protests.

Notably, in 2013, Papuan Oktovianus Warnares was arrested for raising the Morning Star flag (the banned flag of the Papuan independence movement) and remains imprisoned.

The Indonesian army has also not been prosecuted over an alleged massacre in Biak in 1998, when the TNI, led by General Wiranto, were accused of raping, torturing and killing Papuan civilians who raised and guarded the Morning Star flag in West Papua. Given that General Wiranto currently serves as Indonesia's Coordinating Minister for Political, Legal and Security Affairs it is highly unlikely that the Indonesian government will seek to combat this culture of impunity in relation to the Biak massacre in the foreseeable future.

Similarly, the TNI, religious organisations and vigilante groups have not been held to account for their involvement in the 1965-66 mass killings, imprisonments and sexual violence in Indonesia

The pretext for these human rights violations was the killing of seven army officers by the 30th September Movement, which the TNI incorrectly blamed on the Indonesian Communist Party (the PKI).

During 1965-66, at the orders of the anti-communist TNI, led by Suharto, members of religious organisations and vigilante groups armed by the TNI killed approximately 500,000 members of the PKI, individuals formally and informally associated with the PKI and alleged communists.

The military also directly participated in these killings.

During this period, the army imprisoned many individuals without trial and perpetrated sexual violence, including rape, predominantly against female prisoners.

In 2015, Indonesian president Joko Widodo asserted that he had "no thoughts about apologising" about the 1965-66 events.

Arrests made at ceremony to commemorate the 50th anniversary of West Papua's independence. Photo: Indonesian police arrest a man after dispersing hundreds of West Papuans attending a ceremony at Timika to commemorate the 50th anniversary of West Papua's independence from Dutch rule. (Reuters: Muhammad Yamin)

Bans on Marxism-Leninism, PKI remain

The bans on Marxism-Leninism and the PKI introduced by the anti-communist Suharto regime remain in place in Indonesia.

In post-Suharto Indonesia, atheism continues to be associated with communism and public expressions of atheism are illegal.

The ongoing persecution of atheists is illustrated by the fact that in 2012, Alexander An received a two-and-a-half-year jail sentence for posting on Facebook the statement, "God does not exist."< /p>

Indonesia's ethnic Chinese population is also subjected to ongoing discrimination as a Suharto-era ban on Chinese Indonesians participating in the armed forces remains in place.

The death penalty, introduced during Dutch colonial rule in Indonesia, also continues to be used against locals and foreigners, particularly drug offenders, despite condemnation from local anti-death penalty campaigners and multiple states and the fact that the death penalty violates the right to life enshrined in international human rights law.

At a time of rising authoritarianism in south-east Asia, Indonesia must continue to democratise by addressing historical and contemporary human rights abuses, rather than retaining vestiges of authoritarianism.

Olivia Tasevski is an international relations and political science tutor at the University of Melbourne, where she completed her Bachelor of Arts (Honours) and Master of International Relations. Her honours thesis examined US human rights policy towards Indonesia during Gerald Ford's tenure.

Topics: world-politics, human-rights, indonesia

Source: Google News Network: Liputan 24 English | Berita 24 English | Warta 24 English | Netizen 24 Indonesia

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Posted by On 7:54 AM

Another boat accident occurs in Indonesia's Lake Toba, one missing

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Login"; document.querySelector('body').innerHTML += noteHTML; document.querySelector('.timeoutmsg-area .close-button').addEventListener('click', function() { document.querySelector('.timeoutmsg-area').classList.add('hidden'); }); } } function timeoutNote() { var oneMin = 60000; var timeDur = 120; var timeoutDuration = timeDur * oneMin; setTimeout(timeoutEvt ,timeoutDuration); } Another boat accident occurs in Indonesia's Lake Toba, one missing
Indonesian rescue team officers conduct a search operation for the missing victims of a capsized ferry at Lake Toba, in North Sumatra province, on June 23, 2018.
Published8 hours ago

JAKARTA (THE JAKARTA POST/ASIA NEWS NETWORK) - One person was reported missing when a boat capsized in Indonesia's Lake Toba on Friday evening (June 22), just days after another boat sank in the depths of the picturesque tourist destination in Sumatra.

The accident occurred after the engine of passenger boat, the KM Ramos Risma Marisi, broke down while sailing to Nainggolan Port in Samosir, an island at the centre of the world's biggest volcanic lake.

It was the second boat accident to have occurred at Lake Toba within one week after KM Sinar Bangun ferry, which was suspected to have been carrying more than 200 passengers and 60 vehicles, capsized on its way to Tigaras Port in neighbouring Simalungun regency on Monday (June 18). Only eighteen people survived the incident, while three people have been found dead.

The wooden boat involved in Friday's incident was carrying five passengers when it encountered technical problems with its engine at around 9pm local time, after dropping off several passengers at the nearby Sibandang island. One passenger was reported as still missing, while four other passengers survived the incident.

Medan search and rescue agency head Budiawan said the team had been able to pull the capsized boat to Nainggolan Beach, but the whereabouts of Rahmat remained unknown.

Budiawan said the search team would continue its operation to search for the missing passenger on Saturday.

"We stopped our search and rescue operation on Friday evening due to bad weather," he told The Jakarta Post on Saturday morning.

Meanwhile, the search for the 192 other passengers missing in the earlier incident is continuing. An effort to locate the shipwreck is also ongoing.

Topics:
  • MALAYSIA
  • ACCIDENTS - MARITIME

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Source: Google News Network: Liputan 24 English | Berita 24 English | Warta 24 English | Netizen 24 Indonesia